Above the Law Jan. 10, 2018

Forget Marijuana, The Biggest Legal Issue Coming Out of Colorado Is Babies In this case, the Colorado Supreme Court will decide what to do with the ‘leftover’ frozen embryos of two feuding exes. https://abovethelaw.com/2018/01/forget-marijuana-the-biggest-legal-issue-coming-out-of-colorado-is-babies/ #IVF #SurprisePregnancy

February 8th Article at Above the Law: Italy Gets Parents’ Rights Wrong Again

A baby born via surrogate in Russia to an Italian couple was taken away from his parents to be placed with a foster family because no genetic connection was made between the baby and his family (which was another problem – he was supposed to be genetically related to his father, and the Russian fertility clinic is as “surprised” as the rest of us). Read my latest article here.

September 28th Article on Above the Law: Embryos Stuck in India

In this week’s article posted at Above the Law, India’s recent strict ban on surrogacy has had many effects on families, both within the country and without. A ban is also now in place for the transfer of foreigners’ embryos to a different country, threatening the process of couples growing their families. There is no doubt that there is controversy in India over the practice of surrogacy, but there should be no argument over embryos transferred there under different laws.

August 10th Above the Law Article: Bad Judgement

My newest article at Above the Law is about a case in Wisconsin when a couple with an established family through surrogacy was plunged into a terrible limbo when they had a judge that seemed to have a bias against surrogacy and gay parents. States having fair laws about parentage is a great start, but fair judgements for all is the most important.

July 20th Above the Law Article: The Retrieval of Sperm or Eggs After Death

My newest article on Above the Law explores the retrieval and freezing of sperm or eggs after someone dies. Sometimes a family will ask for the gametes in order to carry out the wishes of the person who died to eventually produce children. The court can go either way on it and it’s hard to know what the person in question really wanted, unless they stipulated for it in their will.